Monday, April 6, 2015

NaPoWriMo Day #6

I thought it would be hard to really get down to business and make myself sit down and write a poem each day, but thus far it's going pretty smoothly!

Still plugging away at my poetry-reading.  Currently in the middle of two books...what can I say, I'm a bibliophile.  I'll update as I complete them.

I really loved the prompt over at NaPoWriMo today.

It went something like this:  Today’s (optional) prompt springs from the form known as the aubade. These are morning poems, about dawn and daybreak. Many aubades take the form of lovers’ morning farewells, but . . . today is Monday. So why not try a particularly Mondayish aubade – perhaps you could write it while listening to the Bangles’ iconic Manic Monday? Or maybe you could take in Phillip Larkin’s grim Aubade for inspiration (though it may just make you want to go back to bed). Your Monday aubade could incorporate lovey-dovey aspects, or it could opt to forego them until you’ve had your coffee.

I meant to write specifically about the magical experience of a morning sunrise, but it seems my ancestral roots took my pen by their hand.

Here is the resulting poem:

My Natives Knew No Farewell

Spring clouds hover,
An incessant bucketful of rain,
Across the red-orange horizon
Of another early morning.
The chimes on the porch next door,
Jingle to the tune of a soft wind,
Their strings dancing like
Marionettes on invisible fingers.
Somewhere far away
In a field near the plains,
A windmill catches tail
And begins to spin its rusty wheel.
The winter winds rode out of town
Last weekend with the first
Thunderstorms of April,
Now the red-breasted robins
And Kentucky Cardinals
Prune their nests for new eggs.
Old legend has it that cardinals
Are spirit signs, earthly visitation
From mothers and fathers
Already gone before us.
I hug my coffee cup,
Warm as a still-beating heart,
And grip the war-armor
Of my pen, unafraid because
I have ghosts to keep me company.
The heart-songs of their stories
To strum the stiff strings
Of my poets-heart,
Those brown-skinned mamas
Of Poncho and Pigtail,
Buffalo skin and fine feather,
Still dance rain-circles atop the hills,
Spiritual embodiments
The naked eye can’t see.
And the trees still sing songs
No one alive remembers,
I hear them when the wind blows
Between cedar firs and needled pines,
Across dogwood and
Birch twigs, weather smooth.
They speak in the Native tongue
Of my Cherokee ancestors.
And I believe the sun God still listens.

10 comments:

  1. I love aubades, they have a timeless quality about them. Yours is really lovely, so personal and yet you describe a feeling your readers can relate to - elation.

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  2. And the trees still sing songs
    No one alive remembers... I love every word but this esp.

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  3. Your poem "remembers"... and now, so do we! ♥

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  4. I believe the sun God still listens, too~
    I found your aubade enchanting!

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  5. Ah Stacy, I need to visit more often. Much more often. Gorgeous, in your signature voice, evocative and filled with light. The line I like most:

    unafraid because
    I have ghosts to keep me company.

    ~

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  6. Very well composed, Stacy, entered as one would sipping a first cup of coffee, awakening through the rummage of observation one's true north. How fortunate you find grace still waxing there.

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  7. Hi Stacy--a lovely cadence here and sense of impending day, even as colored by the past. Thank you. k. (Manicddaily)

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  8. "I hug my coffee cup,
    Warm as a still-beating heart,
    And grip the war-armor
    Of my pen, unafraid because
    I have ghosts to keep me company."
    And no need for armor as you sing this song of now and then and always centered out into the world. Thank you!

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  9. Windmill catching tail, robins pruning nests and rain-circle dancing...
    Your ability to create imagery, unique and detailed, reward me every time I read your work.
    Brava!

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  10. "and the trees still sing songs no one alive remembers"....what a beautiful line Stacy...this whole poem is a glorious...such wonderful and lovely ode' to your roots. I love it! :-)

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Thank you for taking the time to comment, it is so appreciated. Your thoughts and critiques are always welcome! I will be by to visit your blog soon!